Notary Journals

Maintaining a notary journal is required by law in many states and strongly recommended in all states. Keeping accurate records of the notarizations you perform is one of the best ways to protect yourself from lawsuits. The journal will document when and where your performed the notarization, as well as details essential to the signing.

Our Classic Journal of Notarial Events was designed especially for the workplace notary who may encounter a myriad of single notarizations in the performance of her or his duties. 

We created our Modern Journal of Notarial Events for the professional notary public. Our MOJO is ideal for signing agents, focusing on loan signings and common notarial acts, like healthcare directives and wills.  In nearly all states, it is typical for notary signing agents to record eight or more notarizations on a single line when performing a witness-only loan signing. This is accomplished by using the combination notarial act/document type checkboxes.

As you shop for journals, pay attention to the following features:

  • Hard v. Soft Cover
  • Type of Binding (Sewn, Perfect, Saddle-stitched/stapled)
  • Orientation (Portrait v. Landscape)
  • Number of Pages and Entries

Our notary journals are among the most respected in the industry. 

What information should be recorded in a notary journal?

  1. the date of each document notarized;
  2. the date of the notarization;
  3. the name of the signer, grantor, or maker;
  4. the signer’s, grantor’s, or maker’s residence or alleged residence;
  5. whether the signer, grantor, or maker is personally known by the notary public, was identified by an identification card issued by a United States federal or state governmental agency or a passport issued by the United States, or was introduced to the notary public and, if introduced, the name and residence or alleged residence of the individual introducing the signer, grantor, or maker;
  6. if the document is proved by a witness, the residence of the witness, whether the witness is personally known by the notary public or was introduced to the notary public and, if introduced, the name and residence of the individual introducing the witness;
  7. the name and residence of the grantee;
  8. if land is conveyed or charged by the instrument, the name of the original grantee and the county where the land is located; and
  9. a brief description of the document.

Filter