Notary Marketing Letters

How to Write Notary Marketing Letters

The biggest notary buzz this week is “Where can I find a form marketing letter to send out for soliciting business from  ______?”  The blank usually contains title companies, doctors, or attorneys most often, but occasionally there are other business professionals mentioned.  

Below is a tip sheet I have prepared for you.  But, before we go into tips and techniques, here’s my best heartfelt advice:

Be brave — write your letter.  You may be surprised at how empowered you will be after you take that step. 

As a business owner, this is a skill that you will need to use regularly.

It’s the first of many steps out of your comfort zone.  So, we’ll get through this first one together.

  • Make the letter short and to the point. 
  • Check your spelling.  
  • Put it down, sleep on it, then look at it the next day for typos.
  • If all is well, send it out!

Don’t wait for the perfect form letter to rise up.  It never will. 

You can do this! 

Study your laws, take quality training on how to be a great notary, and start developing your notary business.  

Tip #1– Know what the targeted audience needs.

Before you send a letter out to a business, it helps to know what types of notarizations they will need.  Get your pen and paper out (or your favorite laptop) and make two columns. Column 1 will be “Citizen or Professional Office,” and column 2 will be “Notarization Types Needed.”  Brainstorm a list of targeted citizen types or types of offices, then write down the kinds of notarizations each of them will need from you.  Do this before you start writing your letter.

Tip #2 – When you write a letter introducing your services, it is best to address it to a specific person.

You may have to make a call to the office ahead of time and explain your reason for writing, and ask who should receive the letter.  (Otherwise, I use this less effective way – I address the owner or targeted professional’s name and add the word “Staff” to show I am interested in those who work in the office, not just the doctor, lawyer, or other professional.)

Tip #3 – Each letter you write should target the type of client that is named in the letter.

One size will NOT fit all.

If you want to be taken seriously, you’ll need to make your letter connect with your targeted client’s needs.  When writing a letter, don’t send it as a generic form letter– write it to someone.  Let that person know that you understand their special pain points relating to locating a mobile notary. 

One “form letter” won’t fit all situations. Each of these types of targeted clients need a letter all their own.

  • Law offices need mobile notaries to go to various types of clients who cannot leave their homes because they are elderly, ill, in hospice care, or have had drivers licenses taken away.
  • Some, but not all, title companies need mobile notaries (notary signing agents) for handling real estate transactions or mortgage loan document notarizations.
  • Doctors, dentists, and just about any type of medical treatment provider need a notary on occasion to handle notarization of medical bill affidavits and various other documents.
  • Pharmacists need affidavits notarized annually, in my experience, regarding their pill count.
  • Minor-aged students may need notarizations of their parents’ signatures for field trips. 
  • While we are on the subject, I’ll mention patients in hospitals need various types of documents notarized. There is an entire article on how to reach those types of clients at this link.

When you reach out to various businesses, imagine you are having a conversation with a frazzled person who needs your services Right Now! 

Don’t just talk to the paper or computer screen about your business.  Let the business owner or citizen know that you feel their pain. You understand what they are going through.  To do that, you’ll need to spend time building your knowledge on who needs notarial acts, what documents they need notarized, and when they are needed most.  This could be in the form of research performed on the internet or even calling some of the places that are mentioned above to do a bit of  sleuthing. 

Tip #4 – Use this letter as a frame to build your own words around. 

After you start learning more about your targeted audience, try your hand at building a marketing letter.  Don’t copy these words verbatim–just use this as a place to start.

Date 

 Mr. John Smith

Business Title 

Address

City, State Zip

              

Dear ____ & Staff:  (1. Your greeting to the professional and staff.)

My name is Sally N. Public and I’m a mobile notary. (2. Introducing yourself.)

I’m in your area quite a bit and noticed your business. (3. Explaining how you got their name.)

I’m reaching out to let you and your staff know about my mobile notary services.  I hope that you’ll consider contacting me if you need  _____service type______ — please do not hesitate to give me a call!  I also respond to text messages quickly!  (4. Let them know you know the type of service you can provide that they need from you here. and  5.  State the purpose for your letter.  Make it clear that you want that office to CALL you.)

My contact information is below.  (5. Provide critical information about how to reach you or give them information about your business.)

Name

Company Name

Address line (Optional)

City, State (Should be included.)

Phone number / calls.

Phone number / text.

Email & website.

Tagline, slogan, etc.

Thank you for your time—please let me know if I can be of service.  (6. Close on a happy, upbeat note.)

Best Regards, (7. You need to have a business-like closing to your letter.)

Be sure to sign the letter!

Sally N. Public

Tip #5 – Don’t stop here.  Follow up is critical. 

You must follow up with a visit or call to the offices you are soliciting.  Let them hear your voice and it’s friendly, confident quality. 

Follow up on your letters within ten days.

If you pay them a visit, give them your business card, shake someone’s hand, look them in the  eye, and tell them you want to be their go-to mobile notary.  Update your marketing letters as needed –tell them how much you enjoyed meeting them.  

Tip #6 – Obtain business cards and emails while you are at the office. 

Do a regular email outreach.

Let your targeted clients and current clients know you are thinking of them.

Work on coming up with a regular schedule for reaching out–this is a part of your “marketing plan.”

Tip #7 – Execute your duties ethically and with dignity. 

Our notary duties are so important.  I know that I have mentioned this above, but you’ll gain an amazing amount of confidence if you know your notary laws inside and out.  Excellent training is available  right here on Notary.net. The video presentation format will keep you focused and engaged. 

I have been a notary for over two decades, but I still seek training so I don’t forget the little things.  Notary.net’s notary training is superior.

Finally, my friends, remember that our general notary work is critically important–as important as our signing agent work. 

My own general mobile notary work has included deathbed clients (for lawyers) who signed wills and end of life documents.  It has included helping people with more than one conviction regarding driving while under the influence to obtain an occupational driver license so they can go to work legally.  I have also administered an oath while a girl gave up her parental rights to her child. 

Those are all serious moments in the lives of people — treat those moments with care and kindness by knowing how to perform your duties skillfully.  

Our notarial duties aren’t just about earning money; we are public servants.

Please join me in being the best notaries that we can be!

 

Brenda Stone

 

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