This topic contains 15 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  mobilenotary 6 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #13919

    eNotary came on strong a few years back and has now seen some setbacks. Most counties were ill-equipped to handle eNotarizations. Pennsylvania took a step back from their pilot program. A young start-up company even tried to circumvent a physical personal appearance through web cam notary program, which no state has endorsed. Use these forums to ask questions and share experiences in this new field.

    #14065

    LindaHFL
    Participant

    I’ve been a notary in Florida since June, 2006 – I have never had a request to do an e-notarization and have only had two inquiries into my capability to do e-signings (electronic loan signings) – because of this lack of interest I’ve not invested in the electronic portion of the notary business.

    #14066

    Are there any eNotary success stories out there?

    #14067

    DocVerify
    Participant

    E-Notarizations is literally in its beginning stages. Electronic notaries is in demand in some places, and not so much in others simply because people are not aware of its existence.

    We at https://www.DocVerify.com have been working very hard with the states and the notaries in order to make e-notarizations easy for both the notaries and the entities or the people requesting them.

    Unfortunately, because of all the confusion caused with previous methods or technologies people think that it’s a very complicated and expensive process; however, we at https://www.DocVerify.com have taken great steps, have spent a lot of time and money to create a system that is easy to use and understand while keeping the fees very low.

    We also feel that notaries can also help by creating demand, which can be done by telling people and/or companies about it. If you’re in a state that allows e-notaries, please take a look at our system, and tell as many people as possibl about it to get the word out. Until then demand will never happen if no one knows that it exists. More demand means more money in your pockets.

    It was not my intention to make this sound like a sales pitch, but we’re all in this together and if our service is in demand then that means your notary services are in demand too because one cannot function without the other.

    #14068

    Geber
    Participant

    It is not at all evident, from looking at the web site, how the DocVerify system would work. It would be interesting to know which state DocVerify thinks allow electronic notarizations.

    #14069

    LindaHFL
    Participant

    Florida Statutes, Section 668.50, has authorized this for FL notaries – and maybe some notaries have found a demand for this, especially those in more densely populated areas or those in corporate settings. I have never had a request or a use for it. However, personal appearance is still mandatory in the state of Florida.

    I just wish this poster for DocVerify, along with all the good promotional comments about the company and its services, would be a bit more up front about the fees involved in their product, which when you look at the website you’ll see can be very very pricey.

    JMO

    #14070

    DocVerify
    Participant

    @geber wrote:

    It is not at all evident, from looking at the web site, how the DocVerify system would work. It would be interesting to know which state DocVerify thinks allow electronic notarizations.

    Geber,

    A list of the states where our service can be found here:
    https://www.docverify.com/Products/ENotaries/tabid/196/Default.aspx

    @LindaH/FL wrote:

    I just wish this poster for DocVerify, along with all the good promotional comments about the company and its services, would be a bit more up front about the fees involved in their product, which when you look at the website you’ll see can be very very pricey.

    Linda,

    Actually, we’ve done everything in our power to keep the costs to individuals like yourself as low as possible without compromising our high level of service. Please keep in mind, that with our service there is no need to buy expensive hardward or software. With other services you may also be required to buy pricey digital certificates every year which could also add up very quickly as well. DocVerify is literally a pay as you go service.

    There is a $99.95 setup which is used to activate, validate, and protect each notary. Our service starts at only $16.95/month, and that comes with 40 documents per month, that’s about 42 cents per document with no limits as to the number of pages; whereas, most other providers will not only make you buy their hardware and software, but will charge you an arm and a leg on a per page basis. In some states, you can charge up to $10 per signature for e-notaries, and our service allows up to five signatures per document. So, using our system you can easily make up to $400/month if the documents only require one signature.

    In addition to all of that, we securely vault the documents for you using our state of the art encryption technologies, we update the digital certificates for free, our proprietary technology makes the documents tamper proof, there are complete audit trails, certificates that you can print out, free inclusion in our notary directory, as well as many other features. We also have a system in place where companies such as escrow or title companies can request to have you e-notarize a document for them without the need of mailing documents or emailing them back and forth, all within our system quickly and efficiently at no extra cost. You get all of this at our low monthly rates.

    Plus our system can be used from anywhere at anytime, from most browsers without having to lug anything around. Please feel free to contact us at anytime sales@docverify.com, and we’ll be more than happy to answer any questions or concerns regarding our services.

    #14071

    Geber
    Participant

    DocVerify wrote:

    A list of the states where our service can be found here:
    https://www.docverify.com/Products/ENotaries/tabid/196/Default.aspx

    No, there is no list of states on that page.

    #14072

    DocVerify
    Participant

    @geber wrote:

    DocVerify wrote:

    A list of the states where our service can be found here:
    https://www.docverify.com/Products/ENotaries/tabid/196/Default.aspx

    No, there is no list of states on that page.

    You have to scoll down towards the bottom to the section labeled “Legally Binding” on the page. There is a list of states there.

    #14073

    Geber
    Participant

    DocVerify, thanks. I notice that Vermont is listed as a state where electronic notarization is allowed, but does not seem to be one of the states supported by your site. I tend to agree that enotarization is legal in Vermont, because Vermont adopted the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act. The Vermont Secretary of State’s page and the Vermont notary manual make no mention of enotarization, so while it’s legal, there is no guidance on how to do it.

    I think it’s a reasonable business decision for your company to not support Vermont, since the main use of notarizations would be real estate and giving permission for minors to travel without parents. Neither immigration officials nor town clerks are prepared to receive electronic documents, so there is hardly any call for enotarization in Vermont.

    #14074

    Paul Pitt
    Participant

    I always ask myself “what could you testify is true under oath.” I have been doing that since I was an Illinois Trooper. You cannot testify that a hunch is true or false (it’s just a hunch). You can testify as to what you saw (in person ..because we know pictures can be doctored up). You can testify to what you measured in person at a day and hour and time and location. You can testify to the photos you take and had developed. What about your notarial events? You can testify to an oath you gave and heard repeated by a specific human being (in front of you). You can testify to having examined a DL or passport and having written (and double checked) what you wrote down. You can testify about the date and time and place something happened (in front of you). You cannot KNOW when a TV show you watched was recorded so you cannot testify. You cannot know who actually wrote an email (it might have been anyone if the email account was open). You cannot testify if a signature is original unless it was signed in front of you. (You can testify if a notarized witness said it was original under oath in front of you — then the burden of perjury is on them). You cannot testify to very much that occurs digitally because you actually do not know. (Realize that anything you are reading on this screen is actually ONLY 0’s and 1’s). You cannot testify to hearsay (the hearsay rule). YOUR NOTARY JOURNAL is sworn testimony. Simple as that. You ARE liable to perjury for any falsehood in the journal. You are liable to perjury for any misuse of the seal (falsity). We’ll probably never be called to court to “answer” about our journal (particularly IF you are following all the rules). Realize that everything in the journal is your sworn testimony — so exactly WHAT could you testify (attest) is true an correct?

    #14075

    Geber
    Participant

    The previous poster asks himself (or herself) what he or she could swear to in court. In a case of an electronic notarization, I could swear that the person appeared before me and did whatever I clearly remember the appearer doing, or whatever my journal says the appearer did. Even if I’m performing an electronic notarization, the person who is to give an acknowledgement or take an oath must appear in person before me. Only Virginia has plans to allow video conferencing, and that isn’t in effect yet. The only notarial act I can think of that I could perform without someone appearing before me would be certifying a copy of a document (including certifying a copy of a page from my journal).

    When examining statements about the laws and rules for notaries, I always ask myself two questions. (1) Does the statement contain any sweeping claims (such as false information in a notary journal being perjury)? (2) Does the statement limit itself to certain named states? If the answer to question 1 is yes and the answer to question 2 is false, the statement is usually wrong. With 50 states, 1 district, and several commonwealths and territories, the only things I’m pretty sure they all agree on is that notaries can take acknowledgements and administer some (but not all) oaths/affirmations.

    #14076

    LindaHFL
    Participant

    @Orwastincer wrote:

    If you are in a state that allows e-notaries, please take a look at our system, and tell as many people as possibl about spreading the word. Until then, the demand will never happen if nobody knows it exists. More demand means more money in their pockets.

    What do you mean by this – “please take a look at our system” – who are you?

    #14077

    Joe Ewing
    Participant

    I agreed to an e signing last month. After downloading about 85 documents I arrived at the borrower’s house and was shown to his laptop. First the customary beginning with ID, Signature in my Journal and the Thumbprint. Then we sign all the paper documents like a traditional signing. All done? Wrong! Next 20 min are spent on the laptop with me ending up filling out forms regarding the closing. So I still have to overnight signed and notarized docs in spite of the esigning however this is a lot better than faxbacks.

    I visit the county clerk quite often and have old acquaintances down there that I share lunch with occasionally. Recently a notary public came in to resign her commission and turn in all her journals as required by the Secretary of State. She had one Notary Journal and a file box full of computer records dating back to 2005. She had worked in an escrow office as an in house notary and had notarized thousands of home loans. Back in 2005 she bought in to the NNA’s electronic notarization program and had used it throughout her short but extremely active notary career. The box contained printouts of years of notary acts, 20 to a page. These lines of printed text included everything required by the state as well as a copy of the signature and tiny thumbprints.

    The Clerk said outright that the entire box full of journal records was impressive but practically worthless in court because the signature ink cannot be tested to verify the date of the signatures were made. Apparently the fact that they were recorded chronologically didn’t matter to the justice system.

    #14078

    jmalone
    Moderator

    Hi Joe,

    Thank you for this story. So good to see you back on a notary board. I too have done e-signings, utilizing the borrowers laptop. As long as they have high speed internet connection and Internet Explorer. I don’t take my laptop.

    The e-sign part is pretty quick for me. However; the last one I did had 114 paper docs to print. This usually only saves time for the lender, therefore, I charge more.

    I do not have an e-journal, nor an e-notarization seal. I think the day is coming soon, where all loan docs will be done on the computer.

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